Preparing Your Daughters For Back to School #KotexMom

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Three years ago, when Angeline went into the 6th grade, we knew that “that time of the month” was quickly approaching.

I sent her to school with a pantyliner in her book bag – just in case she started her period  while she was in school. I had already told her all about the symptoms, and how her body would tell her that she was about to get her period, so that she could let me know and we would make sure she was covered for school.

Two years went by without incident…..and then it happened last year, while she was in the 8th grade.

Ever since that incident, she’s been extra vigilant in making sure that she is covered during school hours.

While most of the conversations my daughter and I have had about menstruation and puberty have been easy, I have been really lucky to have online resources to look to when I needed help – like the Kotex website, that has a whole tween section full of tips and conversation starters for both moms and tweens, courtesy of U by Kotex tween.

Now that Angeline is in high school and has had her period for a few years, we are kind of past the stage of her asking mom questions about puberty and menstruation. Now our conversations revolve around how to deal with that time of the month, how to handle the symptoms and how to avoid accidents!

Angeline pretty much knows the drill; she knows what changes to expect in her body each month, she knows which products work for her and she has learned all of the tricks about hiding the pad up her sleeve or in her pocket when she is leaving class to go use the bathroom at school!

What she doesn’t already know, or doesn’t want to talk to me about, she runs past her friends or finds online, like on the Hello Period site by Kotex Tween.

But of course, each new school year brings its own challenges for girls. Whereas she knew her schedule in middle school and the school layout like the back of her hand, now she has to relearn an entire new school and where all of the bathrooms are. In high school, the teachers aren’t as forgiving of girls who ask to use the bathroom during class.

Before the school year began, we went over a few things to help prepare her for getting her period in school.

  • Keep a Kotex pantyliner in your purse at all times – just in case you don’t have access to your book bag.
  • Also keep a few Kotex tween maxi pads in a small cosmetics bag in your book bag so that you are never without supplies. This is also a great way to help a friend out if they start their period while at school and don’t have any supplies.
  • Pay attention to your body: if you are getting weird stomach aches or your breasts are sore, make sure to wear a pantyliner to school. Make sure your daughters are aware of the symptoms of PMS so that they know when to expect their periods – as we know, it can take a few years for young girls periods to become regular.
  • Don’t be afraid to go to the office and ask for feminine hygiene products if you don’t have any on you, as the nurse will usually have a supply!
  • Keep a travel sized bottle of Tylenol in your book bag to handle cramps while in school (this is obviously only for older girls).

We had already stocked up Angeline’s book bag and purse (they don’t have lockers this year) before school started, as the Kotex tween line are so small and compact, it makes being discreet much easier!

Because U by Kotex makes so many different products for tweens and teens, it’s pretty easy to cover all of your bases with their products. And a great bonus is that their products are actually pretty, so your daughter doesn’t have to be embarrassed to carry them!

If you haven’t had “the talk” with your daughter yet, it’s probably time. Girls are starting their periods younger and younger these days – I was reading somewhere the other day that girls in the second grade were already starting. You might think your daughter is too young and that the talk isn’t necessary, but that may not be the case.

Better to be safe than sorry. Having the period talk doesn’t have to be weird! There are tons of resources available to help both you and your daughter prepare for this event in her life. Let’s Break the Cycle! You can find out more about the Break the Cycle campaign on the U by Kotex website.

While you’re there, check out the incredible selection of U by Kotex tween pads and liners, which are perfect for young girls!

 

I wrote this review while participating in a Brand Ambassador Campaign by Mom Central Consulting on behalf of U by Kotex Tween and received products to facilitate my post and a promotional item to thank me for taking the time to participate.

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Comments

  1. says

    Great tips! We were never allowed to carry Tylenol to school. It would have make things SO much easier, as no pain killer is going to last till the end of the day!

  2. says

    Can I just say I am so NOT looking forward to this stage, having three girls. Thank you for the advice though, it will be much appreciated when the time does come!

  3. Miranda M says

    Wow, I wish I had all these online resources available to me when I was a teen! Also, great job preparing your daughter for the changes in her life and body in such a sensitive and informed way.

  4. says

    We have all boys so I’ll never have to have this kind of talk with a daughter. I do think that it is super important. I remember being so embarrassed to talk with my mom when I got my period. It is great to have all these resources to make the conversations easier.

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